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Here They Come: Travel to Florida in Hurricane Season.

The Fun Zone During Hurricane Season (Florida postcard)Oh boy, as of 1 June we get to start another hurricane season. As one who had a tree fall on her house in a Florida hurricane, I’d like to just take a pass, thanks.

Many visitors to the Sunshine State don’t seem to feel the same dread; they’re ready to take their chances and visit anyway.

As long as people are going to insist on coming, they might as well get some good info and links, right?

You can still catch the last two Star Wars Weekends at Disney-MGM Studios (and if you want to pretty much skip hurricane season, make reservations now for Halloween and Christmas at Disney.)

For more opinions and options, check out the Orlando Sentinel for a good rundown on the theme parks, area attractions and places to visit. The Miami Herald does a great job of laying out itineraries/hotels/eats for a variety of visitors such as “Princess Picky,” “Teen on the Scene” and “Abuela & the Twins.” Besides theme parks, there’s the “other Orlando” of International Drive activities and outlet malls.

Or, just escape Orlando altogether and head for Tampa/St. Pete; many say that the best all-around theme park (for little ones AND those who want to scream their heads off on rides) is Busch Gardens Tampa. I know that my family had a wonderful time there; plenty of rides at all levels for everyone (I lost count of how many times my daughter went on the SheiKra coaster, but I know I had to do it twice.) My young son loved the Rhino Rally and looking at the Budweiser Clydesdales.

Naturally, you can chuck it all and go to the beach — one of the best in the U.S. is near Tampa at Fort DeSoto Park. Aaahhh….

Want to see anything but theme parks and not really very beach-y? Head over to the northern part of the state, which is most “Southern,” the Florida Panhandle.

Whatever you do during hurricane season travel, keep that rental car gassed up, bring a backup evacuation plan/route (or two,) a flashlight and a small transistor radio to stay informed.

And when they say to “git,” you need to listen.